Archive for the ‘Space Business’ Category

A Message to Space

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

This is absolutely brilliant.

An astronaut’s daughter sends her father a message — physically, in writing — while he’s orbiting in the ISS.

It’s emotional, social and very cool. Good marketing on Hyundai’s part, too.

Hyundai made a little girl’s wish come true for the whole world to see.
A team of eleven Genesis cars united to create “the largest tire track image” on the Delamar Dry Lake in the Nevada desert, United States. (Image size : 5.55 sq. km.) This extraordinary message has made it to the Guinness World Records® 2015.

I hope they sell a bunch of cars to rocket scientists!


Sabrett’s Satellite

Friday, March 27th, 2015

This week’s news that traces of nitrates were found by SAM on Mars — and the Fark headline linking it to hot dogs — reminded me to ponder the one decent rumor to come out of the Satellite Show in Washington last week: Apple is buying a spacecraft from Boeing.

You might as well sell one to Sabrett’s to connect all their hot dog carts around the world. Hey, they’re selling branded merchandise, so why not?

Google, Facebook or Amazon might buy one, too. Does anybody at Reuters check this stuff? One call to anybody in the business would tell you “you’re way off on this one.” This is link bait.

Designing, building, launching and operating a spacecraft takes a long time and costs a lot of money. Understand this. This cannot change.

You can have all the bandwidth and high-throughput possible on the spacecraft’s payload, but it means absolutely nothing if you can’t make use of it on the ground. One-to-many distribution is where this technology makes sense — not point-to-point or multipoint-to-multipoint. That’s why TV loves satellite. This network topology can’t change much. Higher frequencies need better antennae for reception — and transmit has its own challenges. If you plan on using mobile frequencies such as those used by Thuraya in Asia and the Middle East, you’d be planning on coordinating with terrestrial and mobile telecoms for more years than it would take to build the spacecraft.

Get over it, people. Building a new satcom network isn’t worth it. It’s like selling hot dogs on Mars: who are you going to sell it to?

With O3b Networks actually operating and building out globally, get in that space and figure out how you can work with it. Latency is minimized on the tech side, and terrestrial connectivity is being added for “the other 3 billion people” inhabiting this planet who are without Internet access.

And put some mustard on it.


WBMSAT News Bits 03/15/2015

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

Featured Article

Photo – U.S. Air Force – C4ISR&Networks

Commercial firm will take over the Air Force’s Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS) constellation by 2016.
[C4ISR&Networks – 03/13/2015]

Read rest of WBMSAT News Bits current issue here.


WBMSAT News Bits 02/20/2015

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

Featured Article

SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory mission – Credit: SpaceX – Space News

SES agrees to be the inaugural customer aboard an enhanced version of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket following careful review of its more powerful first stage engine block.
[Space News – 02/202015]

Read this week’s entire issue here


WBMSAT News Bits 02/15/2015

Monday, February 16th, 2015

Shutterstock / Pavel Ignatov – Market Watch

China nears launch of hack-proof ‘quantum communications’ link, plans satellite launch in 2016 as first step towards quantum network in the sky.
[Market Watch – 02/09/2015]

See full article here:  WBMSAT News Bits


DSCOVR LNCHD!!

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015


Hindsight Prediction in the Quantum World

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

OK, we’ve all heard that “hindsight” is always 20/20. Knowing the past can predict the future.

Now we’re learning that knowing the future can predict the past.

Wait, what?

Professor Kater Murch of Washington University in St. Louis was written up in The Daily Mail

If this proves true in our ‘classical’ world, it would mean that what we’re doing now has been influenced by the decision made by a future version of us.

This all remains theory, but physicists have created devices that has allowed them to measure these fragile quantum systems to see if this really is the case in the quantum world.

Professor Kater Murch at Washington University used this technique to look at the quantum state of two particles at different stages in their evolution.

The quantum state was detected by putting a circuit inside a microwave box.

A few microwave photons – or particles of light – were sent into the box, where their quantum fields interacted with the circuit.

When the photons exited the box they had information about the quantum system.

‘We start each run by putting the qubit in a superposition of the two states,’ Professor Murch said.

‘Then we do a strong measurement but hide the result, continuing to follow the system with weak measurements.’

They then try to guess the hidden result, which is their version of the missing page of the murder mystery.

‘Calculating forward, the probability of finding the system in a particular state, your odds of guessing right are only 50-50,’ Murch said.

‘But you can also calculate backward using something called an effect matrix. Just take all the equations and flip them around. They still work and you can just run the trajectory backward.

‘So there’s a backward-going trajectory and a forward-going trajectory and if we look at them both together and weight the information in both equally, we get something we call a hindsight prediction, or ‘retrodiction.’

The shattering thing about the retrodiction is that it is 90 per cent accurate.

When the physicists check it against the stored measurement of the system’s earlier state it is right nine times out of 10.

This suggests that in the quantum world time runs both backward and forward whereas in the classical world it only runs forward.

Professor Murch told Dailymail.com that it’s as if you left your keys somewhere in the house, but couldn’t remember where.

In the quantum world, they could exist in every room of the house simultaneously.

When you eventually find them in the kitchen, in the classical world it is clear that they were there all along, in the quantum world the uncertainty is intrinsic, but Profesor Murch was able to show that indeed hindsight can be applied to make a better guess about where they were in the past.

In the same way, the improved odds in the current experiment imply the measured quantum state somehow incorporates information from the future as well as the past.

And that might implies that time, notoriously an arrow in the classical world, is a double-headed arrow in the quantum world.

‘It’s not clear why in the real world, the world made up of many particles, time only goes forward and entropy always increases,’ Professor Murch added.

‘But many people are working on that problem and I expect it will be solved in a few years,’ he said.

Very interesting.


WBMSAT News Bits 02/06/2015

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

A diagram shows the coverage areas of each of OneWeb’s planned satellites. – OneWeb – VOX

SpaceX, working with Google, and OneWeb, teamed with Virgin Galactic, race to build satellite internet.
[VOX – 02/05/2015]

Read entire News Bits issue here.

Scorpion in Space

Friday, January 30th, 2015

Since viewing this video in 2007, I’ve appreciated the band’s music more.

Especially this one: the Celebration of 750th anniversary in Lviv, Ukraine on September 30, 2006, with a light show by Gert Hof, centered around the Lviv Opera House.


Big Boom on Wallops

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

This sucks. Critical failure for NASA tonight.

The statement from Orbital

Orbital Sciences Corporation confirms that today’s Antares rocket launch from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility was not successful. Shortly after lift-off from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport Pad 0A at 6:22 p.m. (EDT), the vehicle suffered a catastrophic failure. According to NASA’s emergency operations officials, there were no casualties and property damage was limited to the south end of Wallops Island. Orbital has formed an anomaly investigation board, which will work in close coordination with all appropriate government agencies, to determine the cause of today’s mishap.

Is not nearly as creative and thoughtful as the one from William Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator of NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Directorate

Orbital has demonstrated extraordinary capabilities in its first two missions to the station earlier this year, and we know they can replicate that success. Launching rockets is an incredibly difficult undertaking, and we learn from each success and each setback. Today’s launch attempt will not deter us from our work to expand our already successful capability to launch cargo from American shores to the International Space Station.